UA-33602782-1
Monash Motorsport take out "Best Use of Virtual Methods to Achieve Vehicle Targets" award at Silverstone
Jul16

Monash Motorsport take out "Best Use of Virtual Methods to Achieve Vehicle Targets" award at Silverstone

We are pleased to announce that long term partners of LEAP Australia, Monash Motorsport, have achieved a very respectable fifth place overall in the 2014 Formula Student Competition at Silverstone in the UK.   Among the awards presented at the competition was one for the best use of virtual methods to achieve vehicle targets which was won by Monash Motorsport. With their advanced use of ANSYS CFD Tools for external and internal aerodynamics, as well as ANSYS Mechanical to evaluate part strength and performance before manufacture, Monash Motorsport has always placed a high emphasis on the use of computational tools as a means to achieve top results. Receiving the award was a testament to the hard work that the team members had dedicated to the project, and indicative of the value that motorsport engineers place on simulation tools.   LEAP congratulate Monash Motorsport on their successful 2014 campaign, and look forward to working together in the future. The team behind this outstanding result is currently preparing for the upcoming Formula Student Competition in Germany, for which LEAP wishes them the best of...

Read More
New & Improved: The 2014 FIA Formula One Series
Mar13

New & Improved: The 2014 FIA Formula One Series

    This weekend, televisions around the world will tune into to watch the first race of the 2014 FIA Formula One Championship take place in Melbourne, Australia. Of particular interest to all F1 fans will be the new looking cars with their revolutionary new power units. Formula One has undergone another drastic change in the rules, prompting engine manufacturers to clean-sheet design an integrated turbocharged electric-combustion powertrain system. Of course in addition to the new engine specifications, the governing body also revised the rules controlling the size and shape of the allowable external aerodynamics package. As a result of these rule changes, each team's aerodynamics departments have been forced to perform a complete overhaul of the aerodynamics of their car.  In this video, Australian driver Daniel Ricciardo and world champion Sebastian Vettel from Red Bull Racing explain the most significant changes to the 2014 FIA rules: As they are constantly striving to improve on-track performance, and given the extreme time constraints of competitive motorsport, the traditional product design process of "design-manufacture-evaluate-redesign" does not allow enough potential designs to be evaluated by F1 teams to remain competitive. By leveraging a Simulation Driven Product Design process, F1 teams are testing more designs in faster timeframes, and thus more efficiently working to optimise the final design and extract maximum possible performance within the new rules. Of all the engineering challenges present in F1 racecar engineering, this advantage is most prominent in the field of fluid dynamics: affecting both external aerodynamics and internal flows. Given that the engine dimensions and fuel tank size are now even more strictly controlled, in order for a team to get more power out of the engine than their competitor, they must put more fuel and air into the engine. For every tenth of a gram of air that the team can force into the engine per cycle, approximately 13 extra kilowatts of shaft power can be produced. While not all of that energy makes it into the rear wheels, the resulting increase in power is still immense. To deliver the most air into the cylinder, it is now legal for teams to compress the air by use of a turbocharger (a change which is welcomed by many fans who love that turbo sound!).  For optimum turbocharger design, engineers turn to ANSYS CFD and associated Workbench design tools such as the TurboTools suite which provides highly advanced integrated tools including BladeGen/BladeModeller, TurboGrid, special Turbo Pre and Post-Processing Macros as well as Vista tools.  ANSYS CFD allows turbocharger designers a faster turnaround on designs and works on templates that produce dependably accurate results. For external aerodynamics,  the advantage...

Read More
Formula SAE teams aim for the podium with CFD
Mar08

Formula SAE teams aim for the podium with CFD

Budding F1 car designers & engineers here in Australia may be getting excited in the build-up to the first race of the F1 season with the Australian F1 Grand Prix being held in Melbourne next week (March 14-17), but many of them might also have another important car race in the back of their minds: the 2013 Formula SAE (FSAE) competition, which is the world’s largest student engineering design competition.   Starting in 1979 but really gaining in popularity here during the past 15 years, Formula SAE invites highly-motivated engineering students from leading universities around the world to design, manufacture, test and race their own single-seat racecar. Each car is judged for dynamic performance including acceleration, autocross, endurance, fuel economy as well as other important engineering and business-related metrics such as cost, marketing and design philosophy.   We've previously covered the impact of CFD technology on Formula 1 racecar design, but it is clear that CFD technology provides just as much benefit to the leading Formula SAE teams.  In Australia, LEAP is proud to be closely associated with many of the local Formula SAE teams, including Monash Motorsport and Team Swinburne FSAE.  In particular we'd like to recognise the passion and success of the Monash Motorsport team, who together with Team Leader Scott Wordley have won the past 4 Australasian FSAE titles, and are now ranked 2nd globally (out of 510 graded university teams)!   CFD has formed a pivotal contribution to the design and testing of the aerodynamic package designed for the most recent Monash FSAE car (shown left, image courtesy Monash Motorsport & Mitchell Stafford), which incorporates imposing front and rear wings and a clever floor diffuser.  In any racecar design, competing design goals set the scene for a constant battle to provide maximum downforce for superior braking and cornering performance, without sacrificing raw speed due to increased aerodynamic drag.   Inspired by Formula 1 and refined using CFD, one of the 2013 car's secret weapons is a drag-reduction system (DRS) that automatically changes the angle of attack of the main wings at a certain speed to reduce drag when the car approaches top speed down the straight.   Despite its competitive nature, our observation at LEAP is that Formula SAE is also a remarkably close-knit community as evidenced when Monash Motorsport have generously hosted other teams in their workshop and also given other teams access to their world-leading wind tunnel facilities.  In conjunction with Monash Motorsport, LEAP Australia is preparing to host a special workshop in April covering the use of ANSYS CFD and FEA software for Formula SAE car design.  The 3-day workshop "DESIGN TO WIN" will be held April 2nd-4th at Monash Clayton campus and students from all Formula SAE teams...

Read More
How the top Formula One (F1) teams stay on the podium
Dec05

How the top Formula One (F1) teams stay on the podium

You may already know that Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is currently used by all Formula One teams as part of their ongoing development for their aerodynamics and cooling packages. Since the technologies pioneered in F1 car development regularly flow through into other engineering industries, we felt that a post on this topic was the perfect way to launch LEAP's CFD blog.   In recent years, CFD has become a tool that is no longer just a complement to F1 team's sophisticated wind tunnel and track testing equipment, but an indispensable tool for the top teams to gain that extra competitive advantage. In this post, we will focus on why and how this powerful technology is used by Formula One teams today, as well as global automotive manufacturers who employ similar techniques (within slightly longer timeframes).   Formula One is a unique sport from a technical perspective, where all teams manufacture and design components from a blank sheet to conform to a certain set of rules. These rules are interpreted differently by all teams and as such there is considerable design freedom (amid regular rule changes and updates). Ultimately, this design freedom has a significant impact on the performance of F1 car designs during on-track testing, qualifying and during real race conditions.   The aerodynamic design process must be extremely efficient for a team to remain competitive, as any inefficient period will inevitably lead to a loss of performance compared to other teams that have continued along an efficient development path. This is why supercomputers and wind tunnels run 24/7 at most Formula One team headquarters.   Typical Formula One Super Computer Courtesy of SAUBER PETRONAS Engineering AG   Most teams will adhere to the following development process.   Initial CFD analysis of multiple concepts Further CFD development of the most promising concepts Wind tunnel tests of developed concepts Track confirmation of new parts (usually on the Friday before a race)   This whole process can be accelerated if the performance improvements are found to be significant enough, and potentially any idea (even relatively radical changes) could be designed, tested, and raced within just a two week period.   For an aerodynamicist, the use of CFD is a vital tool in Formula One, as it provides repeatable results in a controlled environment that is sometimes not achievable even in the controlled environment of a $200 million wind tunnel. The aerodynamicist has the freedom to design without limitations on mounting points, prototyping lag times or mechanical issues that may otherwise prevent physical testing. The increasing use of CFD has led to a process that encourages creative design and rapid development of...

Read More
UA-33602782-1