UA-33602782-1
Guest Blog by RMIT Racing: Using Augmented Reality (AR) for R18c - Designing for the Future
Feb22

Guest Blog by RMIT Racing: Using Augmented Reality (AR) for R18c - Designing for the Future

RMIT Racing explains how both their combustion and electric F-SAE teams have decided to employ the use of Augmented Reality (AR) with technical support from LEAP for their 2018 campaigns, including an impressive visualisation of the aerodynamics of the R17c vehicle.

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Exciting advances in Wind Engineering using ANSYS CFD
Apr14

Exciting advances in Wind Engineering using ANSYS CFD

Wind engineering requires engineers to consider how a building responds to its environment as well as the effect that the structure will have on the space around it. Learn more about the use of CFD in wind engineering...

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Using CFD to predict flow-generated noise and other aeroacoustic effects
Nov06

Using CFD to predict flow-generated noise and other aeroacoustic effects

Flow-generated noise can have significantly adverse effects on our everyday lives. Product designers and engineers at the world’s most innovative and successful companies have recognised this fact, and are increasingly using CFD to incorporate noise mitigation strategies into their product design process.

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Can CFD help to solve Australia’s greatest aviation mystery?
Oct18

Can CFD help to solve Australia’s greatest aviation mystery?

On a stormy night in August 1981, a Cessna Centurion 210 aircraft crashed with 5 people on board in Barrington Tops, a rugged and isolated national park north of Newcastle, New South Wales.  Despite a massive initial search effort and ongoing attempts by a group of dedicated volunteers, the challenging and complex terrain has conspired to prevent the wreckage from ever being found. To put this into some perspective: according to Corporal Mark Nolan (Pilot, Australian Army), this is the only aircraft to have crashed on mainland Australia and never be recovered.  We can only imagine how frustrating and heartbreaking this must be for the victim’s families to be denied this closure. One of the biggest factors that has inhibited previous search attempts is the rugged, dense bushland in the Barrington Tops national park. NSW Police Superintendent Peter Thurtell confirms that “the terrain out there is as rugged as anywhere you'll find in Australia.”  Importantly, he notes that the primary search area has two steep ridges that makes it particularly difficult to get in and out each time, furthering hampering the efficiency of any search efforts. However, with recent advances in technology and some novel use of computational fluid dynamics using ANSYS ICEM and ANSYS CFD, we hope that this mystery is about to be cracked wide open.  This coming weekend, the concerted efforts of numerous professional and volunteer organisations (including Police Rescue, National Parks and Wildlife, NSW Rural Fire Service, NSW State Emergency Service and the Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad) will combine to have over 100 members on the ground searching for the elusive wreckage of Cessna 210M VH-MDX. Police Superintendent Peter Thurtell adds that while the team is not overly confident, a lot of planning has been done and he now believes "we've identified an area that gives us the best chance of locating the plane." At this point, you may ask how CFD has contributed to solving this 32 year-old mystery? In advance of this major search operation in October 2013, the search coordinators recently undertook a major push to evaluate all the available evidence and comprehensively review all of the theories about what happened to the aircraft. The technology involved includes side-scan sonar of the Chichester Dam, high-resolution aerial photography as well as LIDAR scans of the likely crash site. After painstaking evaluation of the available evidence, the likely crash site was narrowed down significantly by a team of 5 people, including a Police Rescue intelligence officer, a Police GIS officer, a Navy Pilot, a 1981 Air traffic control operator and a dedicated volunteer, Glenn Horrocks, who just happens to be a specialist CFD engineer (in his ‘day...

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Turbulence Part 5 - Overview of Scale-Resolving Simulations (SRS)
Sep26

Turbulence Part 5 - Overview of Scale-Resolving Simulations (SRS)

An increasing number of industrial CFD users are recognising the need to move away from RANS modelling and resolve a greater spectrum of turbulence (particularly in cases involving large-scale separation, strongly swirling flows, acoustics, etc.). Here we present an overview of Scale Resolving Simulation techniques and important considerations when considering applying SRS to your project.

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