UA-33602782-1
Shape Optimisation without constraints - How to use the Adjoint Solver Part 1
Jul10

Shape Optimisation without constraints - How to use the Adjoint Solver Part 1

Engineers are continually under pressure to improve the performance of their products and often look to gain an edge using optimisation techniques - trying to reduce drag, increase lift (or downforce), or reduce pressure drop. Rather than relying on intuition to make geometry changes that are often constrained (using a parametric CAD approach), you can now use the new Adjoint solver to compute localised sensitivity data (related to your objectives) and optimize your design semi-automatically.

Read More
Swapping Fuel for More Beer on your next Caravan Holiday
Jun21

Swapping Fuel for More Beer on your next Caravan Holiday

Caravan owners are well aware that the speed they drive at and the shape of their caravan can greatly affect fuel consumption.
In partnership with Caravan World magazine, we've taken a closer look into the performance of caravans with the aid of CFD, including some less obvious factors that can help shave off the drag on your caravan and improve fuel consumption.

Read More
Going with the Flow
Jun30

Going with the Flow

The water industry has a range of engineering challenges and specific regulatory requirements, especially concerning flow assurance, water quality, and even component selection. Learn how CFD delivers real value to the water industry - such as predicting complex flow behavior, across individual components or large network systems.

Read More
Can CFD help to solve Australia’s greatest aviation mystery?
Oct18

Can CFD help to solve Australia’s greatest aviation mystery?

On a stormy night in August 1981, a Cessna Centurion 210 aircraft crashed with 5 people on board in Barrington Tops, a rugged and isolated national park north of Newcastle, New South Wales.  Despite a massive initial search effort and ongoing attempts by a group of dedicated volunteers, the challenging and complex terrain has conspired to prevent the wreckage from ever being found. To put this into some perspective: according to Corporal Mark Nolan (Pilot, Australian Army), this is the only aircraft to have crashed on mainland Australia and never be recovered.  We can only imagine how frustrating and heartbreaking this must be for the victim’s families to be denied this closure. One of the biggest factors that has inhibited previous search attempts is the rugged, dense bushland in the Barrington Tops national park. NSW Police Superintendent Peter Thurtell confirms that “the terrain out there is as rugged as anywhere you'll find in Australia.”  Importantly, he notes that the primary search area has two steep ridges that makes it particularly difficult to get in and out each time, furthering hampering the efficiency of any search efforts. However, with recent advances in technology and some novel use of computational fluid dynamics using ANSYS ICEM and ANSYS CFD, we hope that this mystery is about to be cracked wide open.  This coming weekend, the concerted efforts of numerous professional and volunteer organisations (including Police Rescue, National Parks and Wildlife, NSW Rural Fire Service, NSW State Emergency Service and the Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad) will combine to have over 100 members on the ground searching for the elusive wreckage of Cessna 210M VH-MDX. Police Superintendent Peter Thurtell adds that while the team is not overly confident, a lot of planning has been done and he now believes "we've identified an area that gives us the best chance of locating the plane." At this point, you may ask how CFD has contributed to solving this 32 year-old mystery? In advance of this major search operation in October 2013, the search coordinators recently undertook a major push to evaluate all the available evidence and comprehensively review all of the theories about what happened to the aircraft. The technology involved includes side-scan sonar of the Chichester Dam, high-resolution aerial photography as well as LIDAR scans of the likely crash site. After painstaking evaluation of the available evidence, the likely crash site was narrowed down significantly by a team of 5 people, including a Police Rescue intelligence officer, a Police GIS officer, a Navy Pilot, a 1981 Air traffic control operator and a dedicated volunteer, Glenn Horrocks, who just happens to be a specialist CFD engineer (in his ‘day...

Read More
CFD keeps Emirates Team New Zealand on course to reclaim the America's Cup
Aug27

CFD keeps Emirates Team New Zealand on course to reclaim the America's Cup

LEAP staff, in particular our team of CFD engineers, have been watching with interest as the 2013 America's Cup unfolds in San Francisco. Despite being the oldest active trophy in international sport, the America's Cup is continually evolving thanks to an often dramatic combination of ...

Read More
UA-33602782-1